Tag Archives: Grace of God

Crash the Party: Radical Repentance

Crash the Party: Radical Repentance

When one of the Pharisees invited Jesus to have dinner with him, He went to the Pharisee’s house and reclined at the table. A woman in that town who lived a sinful life learned that Jesus was eating at the Pharisee’s house, so she came there with an alabaster jar of perfume. As she stood

Fumbles and Failures

Coaches work hard with players to develop in them the skills needed to protect the ball at all costs. Most NFL teams conduct a regular drill in which the runner scampers past a group of heavy-handed linemen who attempt to knock the ball away. Fumbles, failures, goofs — whatever you call them — do strange

Oddballs, Defectives, Sinners, Aliens, Gentiles… and Grace

Before writing The Jesus I Never Knew, I spent several months researching the background to Jesus’ life. I learned to appreciate the ordered world of first-century Judaism. I admit that the ranking of people rankled my American sensibilities — it seemed a formal pattern of ungrace, a religious caste system — but at least the

The New Math of Grace

When a column of mine titled “The Atrocious Mathematics of the Gospel” appeared in Christianity Today magazine, I soon learned that not everyone appreciates satire. Response letters scorched the inside of my mailbox. “Philip Yancey, you do not walk with God or with Jesus!” wrote one irate reader; “This column is blasphemy.” Another condemned my

God’s Peace for When You Feel Guilty

It’s always tough to sleep when feeling guilty, isn’t it? The snide remark during the meeting, the way you snapped at your mom on the phone, the glare you bestowed on your spouse, the frustration that spilled out when the kids asked one too many questions. You may have felt a moment of relief for

There’s Enough Grace to Go Around

Passage to Read Laborers in the Vineyard, Matthew 20:1-16. Point to Ponder We all have expectations about what we deserve, and if we’re honest, most of those expectations are shaped by making comparisons. We think, “So-and-So got this, so I should get that.” We compare our value against other people and make conclusions. Usually this

Hard Grace

Everything is eucharisteo. Because eucharisteo is how Jesus, at the Last Supper, showed us to transfigure all things — take the pain that is given, give thanks for it, and transform it into a joy that fulfills all emptiness. I have glimpsed it: This, the hard eucharisteo. The hard discipline to lean into the ugly

Top